Gordon B. Hinckley

Gordon B. Hinckley

“Understanding of what? Understanding of ourselves, of the purposes of life, of our relationship to God, who is our Father, of the great divinely given principles that for centuries have provided the sinew of man’s real progress! …

“As we pursue our secular studies, let us also add to our lives the cultivation of the Spirit. If we do so, God will bless us with that peace and those blessings which come from Him alone” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Gordon B. Hinckley, p. 243-244).

Howard W. Hunter

Howard W. Hunter

“In seeking after the welfare of individuals and families, it is important to remember that the basic unit of the Church is the family. However, in focusing on the family, we should remember that in the world in which we live families are not restricted to the traditional grouping of father, mother, and children. Families in the Church today also consist of [husbands and wives] without children, single parents with children, and single individuals living alone. . . . Each of these families must receive priesthood watch care” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Howard W. Hunter, p. 222).

Ezra Taft Benson

Ezra Taft Benson

“I hope we will not live in the past. People who live in the past don’t have very much future. There is a great tendency for us to lament about our losses, about decisions that we have made that we think in retrospect were probably wrong decisions. There is a great tendency for us to feel badly about the circumstances with which we are surrounded, thinking they might have been better had we made different decisions. We can profit by the experience of the past. But let us not spend our time worrying about decisions that have been made, mistakes that have been made. Let us live in the present and in the future.” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Ezra Taft Benson, p. 86).

Spencer W. Kimball

Spencer W. Kimball

“Integrity is a state or quality of being complete, undivided, or unbroken. It is wholeness and unimpaired. It is purity and moral soundness. It is unadulterated genuineness and deep sincerity. It is courage, a human virtue of incalculable value. It is honesty, uprightness, and righteousness. Take these away and there is left but an empty shell” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball, p. 126).

Harold B. Lee

Harold B. Lee

“Don’t dare to go beyond what the Lord has revealed. If you don’t know, say you don’t know; but don’t say you don’t know when you ought to know, because you ought to be students of the scriptures. Inquiries about the teachings of the gospel of Jesus Christ should be answered, whenever possible, from the scriptures” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Harold B. Lee, p. 65).

Joseph Fielding Smith

Joseph Fielding Smith

“The Lord expects us to believe in him, to accept his everlasting gospel, and to live in harmony with his terms and conditions. It is not our province to select and obey those gospel principles which appeal to us and forget the rest. It is not our prerogative to decide that some principles no longer apply to our social and cultural circumstances” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Fielding Smith, p. 234).

David O. McKay

David O. McKay

“There are two purposes for which each chapel is constructed: first, that it might be the place where all may be trained in the ways of God, and second, that in it all might glorify our Father in heaven, who asks for nothing more of his children than that they might be men and women of such noble character as to come back into his presence” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: David O. McKay, p. 33).

George Albert Smith

George Albert Smith

“Our ministry is one of love. Our service is one which enriches our lives. … If we are living as God intends that we should live, if we are ministering as he desires that we should minister, every day of our lives is enriched by the influence of his Spirit, our love of our fellowmen increases and our souls are enlarged until we feel that we could take into our arms all of God’s children, with a desire to bless them and bring them to an understanding of the truth” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: George Albert Smith, p. 14-15).

Joseph F. Smith

Joseph F. Smith

“Fix in your minds noble thoughts, cultivate elevated themes, let your aims and aspirations be high. Be in a certain degree independent; to the degree of usefulness, helpfulness and self-reliance, though no human beings can be said truly to be independent of their fellow beings, and there is no one reckless enough to deny our utter dependence on our heavenly Father” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph F. Smith, p. 319).

Lorenzo Snow

Lorenzo Snow

“Take the case of a virtuous young man who lived before the Gospel was introduced to the children of men. . . . He married a wife, and raised a family; but he never had the privilege of receiving the Gospel, as you and I have. However, he taught his family the principles of morality, and he was affectionate and kind to his wife and children. What more could he do? He should not be condemned because he did not receive the Gospel; for there was no Gospel to receive. He should not lose his wife because when he married her he could not go into a Temple and have her sealed to him for time and eternity. He acted according to the best knowledge that he had, and she was married to him for time . . . We respect that marriage, solemnized according to the laws of his country. . . . We seal children to their parents and wives to their husbands, all along the line” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Lorenzo Snow, p. 141).

Wilford Woodruff

Wilford Woodruff

“Before Christ comes a people have got to be prepared by being sanctified before the Lord. Temples have got to be built; Zion has got to be built up; there must be a place of safety for the people of God while his judgments are abroad in the earth, for the judgments of God will visit the earth, there is no mistake about that; the revelations are full of promises to this effect, and as the Lord has declared it, he will not fail in keeping his word” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Wilford Woodruff, p. 254).

John Taylor

John Taylor

“Thy kingdom come. What kingdom? What is the meaning of ‘thy kingdom come’? It means the rule of God. It means the law of God. It means the government of God. It means the people who have listened to and who are willing to listen to and observe the commands of Jehovah. And it means that there is a God who is willing to guide and direct and sustain his people.” (Teaching of Presidents of the Church: John Taylor, p.223-225).

Russell M. Nelson

Russell M. Nelson

“As fathers we should have love unbounded for the mothers of our children. We should accord to them the gratitude, respect, and praise that they deserve. Husbands, to keep alive the spirit of romance in your marriage, be considerate and kind in the tender intimacies of your married life. Let your thoughts and actions inspire confidence and trust. Let your words be wholesome and your time together be uplifting. Let nothing in life take priority over your wife—neither work, recreation, nor hobby” (“Our Sacred Duty to Honor Women,” Ensign, May 1999).

Brigham Young

Brigham Young

“Every time they persecute and try to overcome this people, they elevate us, weaken their own hands, and strengthen the hands and arms of this people. . . . Righteousness and power with God increase in this people in proportion as the Devil struggles to destroy it” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Brigham Young, p. 265).

Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith

“We know that we have been endeavoring with all our mind, might, and strength, to do the will of God, and all things whatsoever He has commanded us. . . . And now, dear and well beloved brethren---and when we say brethren, we mean those who have continued faithful in Christ, men, women and children---we feel to exhort you in the name of the Lord Jesus, to be strong in the faith in the new and everlasting covenant, and [be not] frightened at your enemies. . . . Hold on even unto death” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith, p. 376).

Russell M. Nelson

Russell M. Nelson

“We live in a most difficult dispensation. Challenges, controversies, and complexities swirl around us. These turbulent times were foreseen by the Savior. He warned us that in our day the adversary would stir up anger in the hearts of men and lead them astray. Yet our Heavenly Father never intended that we would deal with the maze of personal problems and social issues on our own.

“God so loved the world that He sent His Only Begotten Son to help us. And His Son, Jesus Christ, gave His life for us. All so that we could have access to godly power---power sufficient to deal with the burdens, obstacles, and temptations of our day” (“Drawing the Power of Jesus Christ into Our Lives,” Ensign, May 2017).

Thomas S. Monson

Thomas S. Monson

“Perhaps the surest test of an individuals integrity is his or her refusal to do or say anything to damage his or her self-respect. The cornerstone of one’s value system should be the question, ‘What will I think of myself if I do this?’ (“Three Bridges to Cross,” Dixie State College Commencement, May 6, 2011).

Gordon B. Hinckley

Gordon B. Hinckley

“There is a terrible ailment of pessimism in the land. It’s almost endemic. We’re constantly fed a steady and sour diet of character assassination, faultfinding, evil speaking of one another. . . .

“I come … with a plea that we stop seeking out the storms and enjoy more fully the sunlight. I’m suggesting that we accentuate the positive. I’m asking that we look a little deeper for the good, that we still our voices of insult and sarcasm, that we more generously compliment virtue and effort” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Gordon B. Hinckley, p. 70).

Howard W. Hunter

Howard W. Hunter

“It is this last aspect of our self-evaluation---the effect of our lives on the lives of others---that will help us understand why some of the common, ordinary work of life should be valued so highly. Frequently it is the commonplace tasks we perform that have the greatest positive effect on the lives of others, as compared with the things that the world so often relates to greatness” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Howard W. Hunter, p. 164-165).