July 15

July 15

1929 - Using a borrowed microphone, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s first broadcast of what would later become known as Music and the Spoken Word, took place over the NBC radio network.  Ted Kimball was the announcer, Anthon Lund the conductor, and Edward P. Kimball the organist.  Later the weekly broadcast switched to KSL radio on the CBS network.  

July 12

July 12

2006 - LDS Business College moved to its new home in the Triad Center just west of Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. The move was symbolized with 100 students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the College, dressed as pioneers, pulled 15 handcarts full of boxes of books and other materials from the library the several blocks along South Temple to the new location.

July 11

July 11

1839 - On about this day, sickness began to manifest itself among the Mormon refuges in Commerce, Illinois, who had fled the persecutions in Missouri. The weakened state from persecutions, the hot, muggy weather, and the swampy conditions of their new gathering place, all combined to make for an unhealthy situation in the area. The Prophet Joseph would spend time visiting and administering to the sick, “some had faith enough and were healed; others had not.” The sickness would continue for several weeks with many of the sick camping outside of the Prophet’s home along the river. Emma, and others, spent many hours caring for the sick during this time.

July 7

July 7

1852 - The temple endowment is performed in Salt Lake City in the newly completed “Council House.” This is the first time the endowment is available to the general Church membership since the Saints had left Nauvoo in February, 1846.

July 6

July 6

1830 - About this time, the Prophet Joseph arrives home in Harmony, Pennsylvania.  Even though the Church was less than four months old, the persecution had become intense and the Prophet Joseph and other leaders of the Church went into partial seclusion.  The Prophet Joseph received three revelations during this time that are recorded as Doctrine and Covenants 24, 25, and 26.  These revelations include the words, “Be patient in afflictions, for thou shalt have many” (Doctrine and Covenants 24:8) addressed to the Prophet Joseph, and the calling of Emma Smith to select hymns for use in the Church, “for my soul delighteth in the song of the heart; yea, the song of the righteous is a prayer unto me” (Doctrine and Covenants 25:12).

July 5

July 5

1838 - Just over 500 Saints began to gather “about one hundred rods south of the House of the Lord” in Kirtland, Ohio, to organize and prepare themselves for the journey to Missouri.  They were the remaining faithful Saints in Kirtland who were the poor and destitute who would join together for the journey west in what was to be called the “Kirtland Camp.”  They would arrive in October, 1838, where the Prophet Joseph Smith settled them in Adam-ondi-Ahman just a couple weeks before the mob action against the Saints resulted in the Extermination Order. This journey of the poor, but faithful Saints, from Kirtland to Missouri, would become one of the great stories in Church History.

July 4

July 4

1838 - The Saints celebrate the United States Independence Day with the laying of the cornerstones for the Far West Temple in Missouri.  The day proved to be enjoyable to all.  Sidney Rigdon gave a fiery speech against the mob action in Missouri later known as the “Mormon Declaration of Independence.”  This speech is sometimes criticized for its ill-advised and inflammatory words, but expressed the determination of the Saints not to be driven from their homes again.  However, the events of the next few months proved otherwise and the Saints would be leaving Missouri for Illinois by years end.

July 3

July 3

1841 - The Nauvoo Legion was “called out to celebrate our National Independence (the 4th being Sunday), and was reviewed by Lieutenant-General Joseph Smith, who made an eloquent and patriotic speech to the troops, and strongly testified of his regard for our national welfare, and his willingness to lay down his life in defense of his country, and closed with these remarkable words, ‘I would ask no greater boon, than to lay down my life for my country.’” A dinner was then held in the grove attended by officers of the Legion, “and many others, with their ladies.”  (History of the Church, 4:382)

June 29

June 29

1844 - Before a public funeral, over ten thousand Saints view the bodies of Joseph and Hyrum Smith at the Mansion House in Nauvoo, Illinois.  The west door opened at 8:00 a.m. and a stream of people entered, viewed the bodies, and exited out the north door of the Mansion House until 5:00 p.m.  The family then paid their last respects to the fallen Prophet and Patriarch.  Two decoy coffins are filled with sand and are buried during the public ceremony.  William W. Phelps preached the funeral sermon.  Fear of a bounty on the head of the Prophet led Emma to have the real coffins containing the bodies buried secretly in the basement of the unfinished Nauvoo House across the street from the Mansion House at about midnight.

June 27

June 27

1844 - A few moments later the attack on the jail began.  Hyrum was killed first.  John Taylor was shot and he fell under the bed, but survived.  Willard Richards was not injured.  The Prophet Joseph sprang to the window and was shot.  Falling out the window he said, “O Lord, my God!”  The mob dispersed almost immediately when a call went up that “the Mormons are coming.”  A message was sent to Nauvoo written by Willard Richards that stated, “Joseph and Hyrum are dead.  Taylor wounded, not very badly.  I am well.  Our guard was forced, as we believe, by a hand of Missourians from 100 to 200. The job was done in an instant, and the party fled towards Nauvoo instantly.  This is as I believe it.  The citizens here are afraid of the Mormons attacking them.  I promise them no!” (History of the Church, 6:621-622).  The message arrived at daybreak the next morning at the Mansion house in Nauvoo.  In the mean time, word of the deaths had reached the Governor on his way back to Carthage.  He held up the messenger until he could remove all the public records from Carthage in fear of retaliation from Nauvoo.  Samuel Smith, the Prophets brother, was chased by a mob as he was approaching Carthage to visit Joseph.  He became ill from the chase.  By midnight, Carthage was abandoned and only a few were left to help Willard Richards treat the wounds of John Taylor and prepare the bodies for their return to Navuoo.