September 26

September 26

1830 - The Prophet Joseph Smith conducted the second conference of the Church held at the Peter Whitmer Sr. home in Fayette, New York. Joseph records that harmony prevailed at the conference as they discussed Brother Page’s seer stone, which he and all those present renounced, partook of the Sacrament, and attended to Church ordinances and business. The conference lasted three days, “during which time we had much of the power of God manifested amongst us; the Holy Ghost came upon us, and filled us with joy unspeakable; and peace, and faith, and hope, and charity abounded in our midst” (History of the Church, 1:115).

September 23

September 23

1844 - The first capital stone, weighing about two tons, was raised on to the walls of the Nauvoo Temple. The complete capital consisted of five stones and sat atop the 30 pilasters surrounding the Temple walls. It consisted of a base stone, a large stone with a rising sun, a third stone with two hands holding trumpets, and two stones that formed a cap over the trumpet stone. These stones combined would be known as the Sun Stone and would later become a well known symbol of restored Nauvoo.

September 22

September 22

1827 - The Prophet Joseph Smith receives the gold plates, with the Urim and Thummim and breastplate, from the Angel Moroni at the Hill Cumorah. His wife Emma went with him and stayed in the wagon while Joseph went after the plates from which the Book of Mormon was translated. (History of the Church, 1:18)

September 21

September 21

2014 - The newly renovated Ogden Utah Temple is rededicated by President Thomas S. Monson. The original Ogden Utah Temple was originally dedicated on Jan. 18, 1972, by President Joseph Fielding Smith---then the church’s 14th operating temple worldwide. Because the temple’s original cornerstone is still in place and its contents remain unopened, church leaders did not hold a traditional cornerstone ceremony before the rededication.

September 18

September 18

1839 - Elders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball leave Nauvoo for their missions to England. Both were too ill to get into the wagon on their own. They both left their wives and children sick in bed. As they were leaving, Elder Kimball had the wagon stop. He and Brigham Young stood to their feet and shouted, “Hurrah, hurrah, hurrah, for Israel.” The two women, hearing the shout, came to the door and waved a farewell. They then continued on their journey, without purse, without scrip, for England.

September 16

September 16

Driven from his home in Carthage, Illinois, the night before for trying to end the house-burning activities of the mob, Sheriff Jacob Backenstos, a nonmember, flees for his life. He meets Orrin Porter Rockwell and John Redding who were heading to help some of the burnt-out families. As Backenstos entered Hamilton, Illinois, with the mob right behind him, he asked for help and deputized Rockwell and Redding. Rockwell then turned his gun towards the advancing mob. The Sheriff ordered the mob to stop, but they continued forward. He ordered Rockwell to fire. Rockwell did so, aiming at the clasp of the belt on one of the mob who turned out to be Frank A. Worrell, one of the leaders of the mob and who was also the militia lieutenant in charge of protecting Joseph Smith when the he was assassinated the year before. Worrell fell dead off of his horse. The mob then brought up a wagon, put Worrell’s body into it, and left.

September 14

September 14

1843 - The Prophet Joseph attended a second lecture on Socialism by John Finch. After Mr. Finch was through, “I made a few remarks, alluding to Sidney Rigdon and Alexander Campbell getting up a community at Kirtland, and of the big fish there eating up all the little fish. I said I did not believe the doctrine” (History of the Church, 6:33).

September 11

September 11

1857 - In a quiet valley in the Southwestern Utah mountains, the Mountain Meadow Massacre takes place. During a time of heightened anxiety and fears with the U.S. Army approaching Utah, an emigrant wagon train from Arkansas and Missouri traveled through Utah. While camped at Mountain Meadow, a group Latter-day Saint men and Indians attacked the wagon train under a flag of truce and killed 120 members of the group. Only a small group of children were spared. This event is the darkest day in Utah and Latter-day Saint history.

September 10

September 10

1846 - In what became known as the Battle of Nauvoo, anti-Mormon forces begin to attack the city from the East.  Nauvoo was defended by a few remaining members of the Church and many of the new non-LDS citizens who had moved to Nauvoo after purchasing homes and property from Church members as they left for the west.